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European Council Approves AI Act: A Groundbreaking Legislation with Risk-Based Approach and Controversies

European Council Approves AI Act: A Groundbreaking Legislation with Risk-Based Approach and Controversies

European Council Approves AI Act

AI Act: A Groundbreaking Legislation

The European Council has given its approval to the AI Act, following the European Parliament's endorsement. Critics of the legislation argue that it is a means for the European Union to legalize biometric mass surveillance. The EU, on the other hand, is promoting the law as the world's first of its kind, hoping it will set a precedent for AI regulation globally. The Council has described the law as "groundbreaking," adopting a "risk-based" approach. This means that EU authorities will determine the risk level of AI to society and then impose varying degrees of rules and penalties, including financial fines for companies found to be violating the act.

Understanding the Risk Levels

The EU's "granular" approach to risk levels is exemplified by its classification of cognitive behavioral manipulation as "unacceptable," while AI use in education and facial recognition is considered "high risk." Chatbots, on the other hand, are deemed a "limited risk." Developers will be required to register for a risk assessment before their apps can be made available to users in the EU.

Objectives of the AI Act

The EU states that the AI Act aims to encourage the development, uptake, and investment in systems deemed "safe and trustworthy." This regulation targets both the private and public sectors. The law does, however, provide exemptions for systems used exclusively for military and defense, as well as for research purposes.

Implementation of the AI Act

Once the act is formally published, it will come into effect across the 27 member countries within three weeks.

Criticism of the AI Act

When the European Parliament approved the act in March, one of its members, Patrick Breyer of the German Pirate Party, criticized the preceding trilogue negotiations as "intransparent." Breyer, a lawyer and privacy advocate, noted that while the European Parliament initially expressed a desire to ban real-time biometric mass surveillance in public places, it ultimately agreed to "legitimize" it through the AI Act's provisions. Breyer warned that identification based on CCTV footage can lead to errors with serious repercussions. He stated, "As important as it is to regulate AI technology, defending our democracy against being turned into a high-tech surveillance state is not negotiable for us Pirates."

Final Thoughts

The AI Act, with its groundbreaking approach to AI regulation, is certainly a significant development. However, it also raises questions about the balance between technological advancement and privacy rights. What are your thoughts on this? Do you think the EU's risk-based approach is the right way to regulate AI? Share your thoughts and this article with your friends. Don't forget to sign up for the Daily Briefing, which is delivered every day at 6pm.

Some articles will contain credit or partial credit to other authors even if we do not repost the article and are only inspired by the original content.

Some articles will contain credit or partial credit to other authors even if we do not repost the article and are only inspired by the original content.

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