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Tesla Faces Potential $135 Million Fine Over Autopilot Data: NHTSA Demands Transparency

Tesla Faces Potential $135 Million Fine Over Autopilot Data: NHTSA Demands Transparency

Tesla Faces Potential $135 Million Fine Over Autopilot Data

NHTSA Demands Autopilot Data from Tesla

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has issued a warning to Tesla, stating that it may impose "civil penalties" if the company fails to provide data related to its December recall of Autopilot. Following the recall, Tesla released an over-the-air software update aimed at preventing misuse of Autopilot. However, the federal agency initiated an investigation last month to determine if the update was adequate.

NHTSA's Letter to Tesla

Bloomberg reported that the NHTSA published a letter on its website, addressed to Tesla's Director of Field Quality, Eddie Gates. The letter requests data on drivers, including mileage and cabin camera data collected while Autopilot was in use, as well as the number of times drivers were alerted to maintain attention while using the software after the December recall. The NHTSA has set a deadline of July 1 for Tesla to provide this data. The company has the option to request an extension no later than five business days before the due date. Failure to provide the requested information may result in a fine from the federal government.

Potential Penalties for Non-compliance

The letter stipulates that Tesla could face a hefty fine of up to $135 million, or $27,168 per violation per day, if it fails to comply with the NHTSA's request. In December, Tesla announced its largest recall ever, affecting 2 million vehicles in the US due to issues with its advanced driver assistance system. Following the recall, Tesla proposed a five-part software solution. Despite the update, the federal agency expressed concerns about 20 accidents.

NHTSA's Concerns About Tesla's Autopilot

In a statement last month, the NHTSA criticized Tesla's driver engagement system as being insufficient for Autopilot's permissive operating capabilities, describing this as a "critical safety gap."

What are your thoughts on this matter?

This article raises some interesting questions about the safety of autonomous driving technology and the responsibilities of manufacturers. Do you think Tesla should be fined if they fail to provide the requested data? Do you believe the company's software updates are sufficient to address safety concerns? We'd love to hear your thoughts on this topic. Please share this article with your friends and engage in the discussion. Don't forget to sign up for the Daily Briefing, which is delivered every day at 6pm.

Some articles will contain credit or partial credit to other authors even if we do not repost the article and are only inspired by the original content.

Some articles will contain credit or partial credit to other authors even if we do not repost the article and are only inspired by the original content.

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