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Unified Reich Video Hoax: Media's New Attack on Trump

Unified Reich Video Hoax: Media's New Attack on Trump

'Unified Reich' Hoax: A New Low in Attacks on Trump?

Introduction

Recent polls show Donald Trump leading in six out of seven swing states, and in response, it seems the mainstream media has resorted to unprecedented levels of dishonesty in a bid to hinder his campaign. The most recent example is a hoax that saw major news outlets claiming that Trump shared a video suggesting his re-election would result in the "establishment of a unified Reich," implying he was trying to revive Nazism.

Media Response

Several media outlets ran with the story, with headlines such as "Donald Trump 'Unified Reich' Video Leaves People Stunned" from Newsweek, and "White House Slams ‘Sickening’ Video Shared By Trump Referencing ‘Unified Reich'" from The Hill. Television news anchors and social media users also expressed their outrage, including Michael Hayden, a prominent figure in the intelligence community.

White House Reaction

The White House also responded to the video, with Deputy White House Press Secretary Andrew Bates describing it as "abhorrent, sickening, and disgraceful." Joe Biden, the president at the time, expressed his shock and disgust at the video, reinforcing the narrative that Trump was using language associated with Adolf Hitler.

The Reality

However, the reality of the situation was far less sinister. The video, which was created by someone outside of Trump's campaign and shared on his Truth Social account, used a stock video template available for purchase online. The controversial headline, "German Industrial Strength After 1871 Driven By The Creation Of A Unified Reich," was part of the template and served as background filler.

Media Misrepresentation

Despite the innocuous nature of the video, media outlets and fact-checking sites like Snopes continued to frame it as evidence of Trump's alleged endorsement of Nazism. David Graham of The Atlantic, while explaining that the video wasn't as it seemed, also perpetuated the myth that Trump had called neo-Nazi marchers in Charlottesville "very fine people."

Conclusion

Just as the "very fine people" hoax continues to circulate, it's likely that the "unified reich video" hoax will also persist. It seems that Scott Adams, the creator of the Dilbert comic strip and a vocal critic of media misinformation, may need to update his hoax quiz once again.

What Do You Think?

This article raises important questions about the role of the media in shaping public opinion and the potential for misinformation to spread. What are your thoughts on this issue? Do you think the media was fair in its portrayal of Trump's video? Share this article with your friends and join the conversation. Don't forget to sign up for the Daily Briefing, which is delivered every day at 6pm.

Some articles will contain credit or partial credit to other authors even if we do not repost the article and are only inspired by the original content.

Some articles will contain credit or partial credit to other authors even if we do not repost the article and are only inspired by the original content.

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